The official store of TSHA All proceeds support Texas history educational efforts

Free shipping - no minimums!

Texas Biographies

Buy this bundle and save 8%

Enjoy great titles focusing on Texas biographies when you purchase this book bundle.
Price$378.52

Products in this bundle include:

Texas, Her Texas: The Life and Times of Frances Goff

Original Price
36.95
ISBN
9780876111598
Binding
Hardcover
By
Lewis L Gould, Nancy Young
Texas, Her Texas is the fascinating story of Frances Goff and her three remarkable careers: in Texas government as legislative aide and State Budget Director; at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center; and as Director of the Bluebonnet Girls State Program of the American Legion Auxiliary. Based on Goff’s personal papers and interviews with those who knew her, including former Texas Governor Ann Richards, the book provides inside glimpses of such leaders in state politics as Coke Stevenson, Allan Shivers, and Richards herself. The fast-paced narrative also describes the founding and early years of M. D. Anderson and Goff’s key role as an aide to Dr. R. Lee Clark in building this world-renowned cancer treatment facility.At the core of the book is the Bluebonnet Girls State Program, an annual citizenship session for young Texas women that Goff directed for four decades. More than twenty thousand high school girls experienced Goff’s charismatic leadership and took to heart her message of public service and involvement. In turn, they became part of Goff’s statewide network. Texas, Her Texas makes a major contribution to a better understanding of how this voluntary women’s group is shaping present-day Texas.Frances Goff was a people person, and it is the portraits of those whose lives she touched that make this book so readable. From her youthful days in Kenedy to the corridors of the Texas Capitol, Goff knew the movers and shakers of Texas--Barbara Jordan, Lyndon Johnson, George Bush, Jack Cox, and Lloyd Bentsen, to name just a few--and became one herself. Goff’s biography will inspire those who knew her and those who are learning about her for the first time. She was, says Ann Richards, a "grand lionness of a woman," and Texas, Her Texas is her story.Number Six: Barker Texas History Center Series
[...]

A Breed So Rare: The Life of J. R. Parten, Liberal Texas Oil Man, 1896–1992

Original Price
46.95
ISBN
9780876111666
Binding
Hardcover
By
Don Carleton
No Texas archetype is more indelibly stamped on the public perception than the Texas oil man--a shrewd, flamboyant figure captured most recently in the character of J. R. Ewing in the long-running television series "Dallas." During the 1980s when this program was playing worldwide, reinforcing the stereotype of the oil man as a conservative, unprincipled rogue, another Texas oil man named J. R.--in this case, J. R. Parten--was quietly concluding a remarkable career that spanned most of the twentieth century. Although J. R. Parten shared some characteristics with the fictional J. R. Ewing--he was a highly successful and tough-minded entrepreneur--Parten was a quiet gentleman, loyal to his friends, and a man of honor and principle. Little known during his lifetime, he remains a relatively anonymous figure despite the fact that he played a number of historically significant roles in Texas and the nation, and counted numerous bigger-than-life characters as colleagues, associates, and friends: Huey Long, Sam Rayburn, John Henry Faulk, Lyndon B. Johnson, and Harry Truman, among others.Through numerous interviews and unlimited access to Parten’s personal papers, the author tells the fascinating story of Parten’s life, from small town East Texas at the turn of the century to the capitals of the world. After studying at the University of Texas from 1913 to 1917, he served in World War I as the youngest major in the field artillery. He entered the oil business in 1919 and was a true pioneer in the industry, establishing numerous energy businesses that earned millions of dollars and employed thousands of people. While serving on the University of Texas Board of Regents from 1935 to 1941, Parten used his knowledge of the oil business to greatly increase the university’s income from its oil holdings, and fought tenaciously for academic excellence and freedom of speech for students and faculty. When democracy was threatened during World War II, Parten was a dominant figure in the development of the "Big Inch" and "Little Inch" pipelines, which stretched from East Texas to the East Coast and provided critical fuel for the victorious Allied war effort. In 1945 Parten served as chief of staff for the U.S. delegation to the Allied War Reparations Commission in Moscow and later participated in the Potsdam Conference in Berlin.A lifelong Democrat of moderately liberal cast, Parten was a player in state and national politics, often crusading on the liberal and losing side of elections and issues. In 1950 he helped establish the Fund for the Republic in an effort to counter threats to basic civil liberties during the Red Scare of the 1950s. His support for the Texas Observer and for sometimes unpopular politicians and ideas brought important liberal ideas to the local and national stage. As a generous philanthropist and political activist--often behind the scenes--Parten supported world peace and opposed nuclear weapons and the Vietnam War. A man who stood firmly behind his beliefs, Parten was a quiet doer in a culture that is more likely to recognize the flamboyant gesture. He held fast to his principles, but as a lifelong learner he was always willing to change. J. R. Parten was a man who made a difference.
[...]

William Pitt Ballinger: Texas Lawyer, Southern Statesman, 1825–1888

Original Price
24.99
ISBN
9780876111994
Binding
Paperback
By
John Moretta
Few people have played a more important role in the history of Texas than William Pitt Ballinger. Though not as well known as legendary figures Stephen F. Austin or Sam Houston, Ballinger is one of those individuals whose behind-the-scenes life had a major impact on the events of his time. This thoroughly researched and engagingly written biography brings Ballinger to life as one of the most complete men of his time: lawyer, soldier, public servant, civic leader, author, editorialist, naturalist, education reformer, and bibliophile.In his long and illustrious career as a lawyer, Ballinger was usually the picture of calm and confidence, but on the morning of April 21, 1881, he found it difficult to maintain his composure as he awaited a conference with Jay Gould, the legendary “robber baron" of the Gilded Age, who had written Ballinger just six days earlier “to obtain the best legal advice I can."
[...]

Mistress of Manifest Destiny: A Biography of Jane McManus Storm Cazneau, 1807-1878

Original Price
36.95
ISBN
9780876111796
Binding
Hardcover
By
Linda S. Hudson
Jane McManus Storm Cazneau (1807-1878) was a complex person who died at sea the way she lived--at the center of a storm of controversy. Whether as Aaron Burr’s mistress, land speculating in Texas, behind enemy lines during the Mexican War, filibustering for Cuba or Nicaragua, promoting Mexican revolution from a dugout in Eagle Pass, or urging free blacks to emigrate to the Dominican Republic, Cazneau seldom took the easy path. She foresaw a nation with equal rights for all in a world in which representative government was the norm rather than the exception.As a journalist, an advisor to national political figures, and publicist, she helped shape United States domestic and foreign policy from the mid-1840s into the 1870s. Cazneau’s most unique contribution was as a staff writer for John L. O'Sullivan, editor of the United States Magazine and Democratic Review, where she described the mission of the United States as "Manifest Destiny," thereby coining one of the most significant and influential phrases in American political history.A single parent and working mother, Cazneau was not a women’s rights woman who agitated for suffrage. She ridiculed the Seneca Falls housewives’ complaints because real oppression existed for women in the factories, in the needle trades, on Indian reservations, and in the Caribbean. Cazneau advised working women to educate themselves and take better-paying men’s clerical jobs.Although it appeared that her schemes and speculations failed, many of the policies she advocated eventually succeeded. She promoted the need for a steam navy and merchant marine fifty years before Alfred T. Mahan. She wrote about the problems of the working class sixty years before it became a Progressive crusade, advocated agrarian reform fifty years before Populists took up the cause, and assisted republican revolutionaries a hundred years before the United States awoke to the needs of the ordinary people in the sister republics of the Western Hemisphere.Cazneau's letters, books, journal, and newspaper articles leave little more than a hint of her intelligence and conversational wit, a mere suggestion of her sexuality and explosive temper, a glimpse of her courage and spirituality, and a trace of her sense of humor reflected in the sparkle of violet eyes beneath raven hair and a dark complexion that was her distinguishing trait. She was dedicated to the expansion of republican government; she had a special place in her heart for the abandoned and neglected, whether persons or animals; and she had a deep and abiding love for her country and faith in its people and in its future.
[...]

Stephen F. Austin: Empresario of Texas

Original Price
36.99
ISBN
9781625110374
Binding
Paperback
By
Gregg Cantrell
The Texas State Historical Association is pleased to offer a reprint edition of Stephen F. Austin: Empresario of Texas, Gregg Cantrell’s path-breaking biography of the founder of Anglo Texas. Cantrell’s portrait goes beyond the traditional interpretation of Austin as the man who spearheaded American Manifest Destiny. Cantrell portrays Austin as a borderlands figure who could navigate the complex cultural landscape of 1820s Texas, then a portion of Mexico. His command of the Spanish language, respect for the Mexican people, and ability to navigate the shoals of Mexican politics made him the perfect advocate for his colonists and often for all of Texas. Yet when conflicts between Anglo colonists and Mexican authorities turned violent, Austin’s accomodationist stance became outdated. Overshadowed by the military hero Sam Houston, he died at the age of forty-three, just six months after Texas independence. Decades after his death, Austin’s reputation was resurrected and he became known as the “Father of Texas." More than just an icon, Stephen F. Austin emerges from these pages as a shrewd, complicated, and sometimes conflicted figure.
[...]

José Antonio Navarro: In Search of the American Dream in Nineteenth-Century Texas

Original Price
31.95
ISBN
9780876112441
Binding
Paperback
By
David R. McDonald
The first biography to appear in more than a generation on the most influential Tejano leader of the nineteenth century, José Antonio Navarro: In Search of the American Dream in Nineteenth-Century Texas fills one of the most glaring gaps in the current historical literature on Texas. The product of a lifetime of research by author David McDonald, this volume is sure to stand as the definitive treatment of Navarro’s life for decades to come. McDonald corrects many long-standing misconceptions concerning Navarro and fleshes out the details of his life in a way no author has done before.Born in San Antonio in 1795, José Antonio Navarro lived through a tumultuous era in Texas history that saw the transitions of Texas from a Spanish colony to a Mexican state, an independent republic, an American state, a Confederate state, and an American state once again. More than just bearing witness to these events, however, José Antonio Navarro helped shape them. He served in the legislatures of Coahuila y Texas, the Republic of Texas, and the state of Texas. He was a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence and a steadfast defender of the rights of all Tejanos and people of Mexican descent in Texas, ensuring at both the 1836 Consultation that created the Texas Republic and the 1845 drafting of the state constitution after annexation that political rights would not be restricted solely to those with white skin and pure European ancestry. José Antonio Navarro has won a 2013 citation from the San Antonio Conservation Society's Publications Awards Committee.José Antonio Navarro: In Search of the American Dream in Nineteenth-Century Texas is more than just a political biography; it is a story of the American Dream. Navarro and his family worked hard to improve their lives on the Texas frontier, starting with his father, an immigrant from the Mediterranean island of Corsica. Navarro was not only an influential politician, but a successful businessman and rancher. This pattern of improvement continued into the next generation of the family when Navarro’s son Ángel entered Harvard College to study law. José Antonio Navarro was also an early friend of Stephen F. Austin, sharing a vision of Texas with the famed empresario in which both Tejanos and Anglos could thrive. Navarro believed that Texas was a place where peoples of all colors and backgrounds should be able to realize the American Dream.Published with the generous assistance of the Friends of Casa NavarroNumber Two in the Watson Caufield and Mary Maxwell Arnold Republic of Texas Series  
[...]

Ima Hogg: The Governor's Daughter

Original Price
19.95
ISBN
9780876112458
Binding
Paperback
By
Virginia Bernhard
Texas legend has it that James Stephen Hogg, Governor of Texas from 1890 to 1894, named his daughters Ima and Ura, but that is only half-true: there never was a Ura. Ima had three brothers, Will, Mike, and Tom. Ima Hogg, who was born in 1882 and died in 1975 at age 93, became a legend in her own right, and this book is her story. It is also the story of the extraordinary bond between a father and a daughter. James Stephen Hogg, who worked his way from a hardscrabble life in the piney woods of East Texas to the Governor's Mansion in Austin, was a giant in Texas politics, both literally (standing six feet three inches tall and weighing close to 300 pounds) and figuratively, as the champion of the "little people" against big business in the 1890s. He adored his daughter, and after his wife, Sallie Stinson Hogg, died of tuberculosis in 1895, Ima and her father drew even closer. Jim Hogg, a widower in his 40's with four children--Will, 20; Ima, 13, Mike, 10, and Tom, 8--left politics to practice law in Austin, and Ima became the "sunshine" of her father's household. While Ima attended the University of Texas and then studied music in New York City, ex-Governor Hogg pursued business interests, and was one of the early investors in the Texas oil boom after the Spindletop gusher in 1901. He was not a rich man when he died in 1906, but the old plantation he bought in Brazos County near West Columbia would eventually produce oil that would make Ima and her brothers wealthy. The Hogg children lived well, but they also devoted part of their time and money to the enrichment of the educational and cultural life of Texas. Will gave generously to the University of Texas, his alma mater, and to many other institutions, such as the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Houston YMCA. “Miss Ima," as she was known (she never married), founded the Houston Symphony, served on the Houston School Board, established the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health, and restored several historic Texas buildings, including the house at the Varner-Hogg Historic Site, which had been her father's beloved country home. In 1966 she gave her own house, filled with the priceless Early American art and furniture she had collected, as the Bayou Bend Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Thousands of people visit Bayou Bend every year, and this book describes its history, as well as that of an extraordinary Texas woman.  Ima Hogg: The Goverrnor's Daughter is number 20 in the Fred Rider Cotten Popular History Series. 
[...]

Women in Early Texas

Original Price
26.95
ISBN
9780876111420
Binding
Paperback
By
Evelyn M. Carrington
First published by the Jenkins Publishing Company in 1975 and long out of print, Women in Early Texas is now available again with a new scholarly introduction by award-winning Texas historian Debbie Mauldin Cottrell.The volume contains biographies of fifty notable women whose lives deeply influenced the way Texas developed. Many of the biographies were written by descendants of the women and have been extensively researched and supplemented by heretofore unused family records and papers. The stories of these inspiring women are fine examples of local history and will be of interest to scholars doing research, teachers seeking classroom material, and general readers looking for stories of women out of Texas's past.Debbie Mauldin Cottrell's introduction places this groundbreaking book and these diverse women in historical perspective, and provides an excellent bibliography of other sources for researchers and readers.Publication of this book was made possible in part by a grant from the American Association of University Women--Austin Branch.
[...]

Peg Leg: The Improbable Life of a Texas Hero, Thomas William Ward, 1807-1872

Original Price
46.95
ISBN
9780876112373
Binding
Hardcover
Irish-born Thomas William ("Peg Leg") Ward ventured to Texas in 1835 to fight in the Texas Revolution, but in his first day of action his right leg was hit by Mexican cannon fire in and amputated. Four years later he lost his right arm to cannon fire in an accident. Though confronted with an unending problem of mobility and tormented by pain in his residual leg, Ward surmounted his horrific injuries to become a notable public figure.Ward’s public career spanned three decades and a multiplicity of responsibilities--military officer, three-time mayor of Austin, presidential appointments as U.S. Consul to Panama and a federal customs official in Texas--but it was as Texas land commissioner during the 1840s that he particularly made his mark. At a time when land was the principal asset of the Texas republic and the magnet that attracted immigrants, he fought to remedy the land system’s many defects and to fulfill the promise of free land to those who settled and fought for Texas.If Ward had a remarkable career, his life was nonetheless troubled by symptoms comparable to those experienced by recent war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder--a hair-trigger temper, an impulse to violence, and marital discord. His wife, Susan Ward, though deeply in love with him at the start, eventually left him and accused him in two bitterly fought court cases of verbal, psychological, and physical abuse. To many of his fellow Texans, however, Ward remained a hero who had sacrificed his leg for a noble cause--independence from Mexico.
[...]

Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca: The ‘Great Pedestrian’ of North and South America

Original Price
19.95
ISBN
9780876112519
Binding
Paperback
By
Donald Chipman
 Cabeza de Vaca’s mode of transportation, afoot on portions of two continents in the early decades of the sixteenth century, fits one dictionary definition of the word “pedestrian." By no means, however, should the ancillary meanings of “commonplace" or “prosaic" be applied to the man, or his remarkable adventures. Between 1528 and 1536, he trekked an estimated 2,480 to 2,640 miles of North American terrain from the Texas coast near Galveston Island to San Miguel de Culiacán near the Pacific Coast of Mexico. He then traveled under better circumstances, although still on foot, to Mexico City. About a year later, Cabeza de Vaca returned to Spain. In 1540, the king granted Cabeza de Vaca civil and military authority in modern-day Paraguay. After arriving on the coast of Brazil in 1541, he was unable to find transportation by ship to the seat of his governorship. He then led a group of more 250 settlers through 1,200 miles of unchartered back country, during which he lost only two men.Cabeza de Vaca’s travels are amazing in themselves, but during them he transformed from a proud Spanish don to lay advocate of Indian rights on both American continents. That journey is as remarkable as his travels. It was this “great awakening"  that landed him in more trouble with Spaniards than Indians. Settlers at Asunción rebelled against the reformist governor, incarcerated him, tried to poison his food on two occasions, and finally sent him to Spain in irons. There he was tried and convicted on trumped-up charges of carrying out policies that were the exact opposite of what he had promoted—the humane protection of Indians.This book examines the two great “journeys" of Cabeza de Vaca—his extraordinary adventures on two continents and his remarkable growth as a humanitarian.
[...]

Abner Cook: Master Builder on the Texas Frontier

Original Price
23.95
ISBN
9780876111017
Binding
Paperback
By
Kenneth Hafertepe

Abner Cook has long been acknowledged as the most important architect in antebellum Texas, but this extensively illustrated volume is the first to document fully his life and works. This well-told history of Cook's life also presents a vivid account of his city--nineteenth-century Austin.

[...]

Eugene C. Barker: Historian

Original Price
26.95
ISBN
9780876110256
Binding
Hardcover
By
William C. Pool

Eugene C. Barker, one of the most influential historians to teach at the University of Texas, has been described as "a granite monolith," "half sabre-toothed tiger and half St. Francis of Assisi," with "a mind like a surgeon's scalpel." The late William C. Pool, Barker's former student, presents a vivid portrait of Barker from knowledge-hungry youth to administrator, professor, leader, author, and historian.

[...]

Travels with Joe: The Life Story of a Historian from Texas, 1917–1993

Original Price
31.95
ISBN
9780876111819
Binding
Hardcover
By
David McComb

He once said, Texas is twelve million people who are bright and dumb, conservative and liberal, tall and short and slim and fat, courageous and cowardly;just like people in Connecticut and Oregon. And, The philosophy of the cowboy is not spoken, but tacit. It must remain what he was, not what he said. And, Academics everywhere are generally as rigid as rednecks, as conservative as successful farmers, and as irrational as zealots.

Joe B. Frantz was noted for his entertaining talks, his love of anecdote, and his wit in phrase-making. He spent his life working as a college professor of history at the University of Texas at Austin and at Texas A&MCorpus Christi. He was director of the Texas State Historical Association from 1966 to 1977 and gathered the oral history of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration. Along the way he taught graduate students, wrote books and articles, and gave speeches. Joe, as he preferred to be called, received the mantle of Texas history from his mentor, Walter Prescott Webb, and progressed to become a recognized western and national historian. His era spanned the time when the University of Texas became a major doctoral school that trained research historians, and his students are now senior professors in departments across the country.

This engagingly written biography of Frantz traces his lifetime from an orphan in Dallas until his death in Houston in 1993. Written by Texas historian David G. McComb, a former student of Frantz's, Travels with Joe is based upon Frantz's personal papers, interviews, and writings. It narrates the story of Frantz's triumphs and storms and captures the essence of this fascinating and influential man. Life, for Joe B. Frantz, was a grand journey, an adventure that he preferred to share with others. This book is about his journey.

[...]

Product Details

Category Tags: 
Status:
Active
SKU:
BOOK-BUNDLE-TSHA-PRESS-BIO

Get your 10% off coupon now!

Enter your email to receive special discount offers & coupons.

I give my consent to to be in touch with me via email using the information I have provided in this form for the purpose of news, updates and marketing.

What to expect : If you wish to withdraw your consent and stop hearing from us, simply click the unsubscribe link at the bottom of every email we send or contact us at orders@legacyoftexas.com. We value and respect your personal data and privacy. To view our privacy policy, please visit our website. By submitting this form, you agree that we may process your information in accordance with these terms.